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Washer door boot  Rating:  Rating
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 Posted: Sat Jul 9th, 2005 06:48 am
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Jimmy
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Dearest Master,

While my beautiful, talented domestic goddess was pulling laundry from the GE Spacemaker washer (model WSXH208A1WW) the rubber boot seal got caught on a pair of pants.  Along with the pants came the retainer spring that holds the rubber boot.  :yikes:


Looking this over dilemma (and not having the implanted TAAMI) I am without an idea on how I should go forward.  Obviously the spring must be re-installed over the boot, however accomplishing this feat will require your enlightenment.


I humbly ask that you share your wisdom.

Jimmy


Ps: please forgive me for using the offensive “GE” word

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 Posted: Sat Jul 9th, 2005 02:10 pm
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Samurai Appliance Repair Man
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It's not really a GE... it's a Friggidaire.  Almost as bad. 

Let this procedure from the Friggidaire service manual for replacing the boot be your guiding light and inspiration: 



 1) If the machine has a Dryer stacked on top of it or is positioned in such a way that it would be too much bother to move, you will be better off leaving it where it is. However, if it is possible, it would be easier to do this job if the machine could be leaned If leaning it back is not possible, then a 6 or 8 inch block of wood will be handy to use to wedge between the front panel and the tub to hold the tub back out of the way.


2) The boot is attached to a lip around the perimeter of the opening in the front panel and is glued on in spots about three inches apart, all the way around. Use a razor blade as shown in illustration #1 to carefully slice the glued spots on the boot away from the front panel.

3) Once the boot is loose from the front panel, push it into the opening of the tub and out of the way as shown in illustration #2. At this point, if the machine is not leaning back, take your block of wood and while pushing back on the tub through the opening, wedge the block between the front panel and the tub about ten inches to the bottom - right of the opening. This will afford you more space to work with the boot.

4) You will now notice that the boot is still attached to the duct that is located just inside the front panel at the upper left corner from the opening. This is where the water, soap, bleach and fabric softener enter the tub. To remove (and later on, reattach) the clamp holding this in place on the end of the duct you will have to make yourself a tool from a three inch piece of 3/8 inch soft copper tubing. In illustration #3 you will see that the end of the tube is flattened somewhat so that it can be slipped over the twisted ends of the clamp as shown in illustration # 4. Twist the tube counterclockwise to slip the clamp and set both the tool and the wire clamp aside. Pull the boot free from the duct.

5) Using both hands, grab onto the boot at the top of the opening to the tub and pull downward and toward you with slow steady pressure. As the boot is pulled free from the outer lip of the tub (at the top), the coiled spring that holds the boot from the groove behind the lip around the opening to the front shell will become visible. You can either continue pulling on the boot until it comes off or you can hook the spring ( with a piece of coat hanger fashioned into a hook ) and pull it off and then pull the boot off separately.

6) Once the boot is off, examine the lip that extends around the entire perimeter of the front opening of the front shell of the tub ( the front shell and the rear shell are so named because when bolted together, form the outer tub that surrounds the inner tub ). The boot has a lip that will have to be folded into the groove behind the lip on the front shell. To start this, examine the new boot and locate the groove in front of the lip that corresponds to the similar lip and tab on the tub shell. It will make this job a lot easier if you can obtain some liquid dishwashing soap from the consumer, and sparingly lubricate this groove on the boot to make it easier to slip onto the lip of the shell (see illustration # 5 ). No soap is preferable to too much soap. Have a cloth handy to wipe the soap from your fingers.

7) Once the groove in the boot is lubed with soap, locate the arrow as shown in figure #6 that is located on the top of the boot (located to the right of the extrusion that slips over the duct). This arrow must point up when the boot is installed.

8) With the boot in one hand and the other hand spreading the lip and groove (on the boot near the arrow), force the lip into the groove behind the lip at the top of the opening on the tub shell (see figure #7).

9) With one hand holding the boot so it does not slip off, use the other hand to continue spreading the lip and groove of the boot further to the right. In this way you continue this action 360 degrees around until the boot is mounted onto the front shell ( see # 8 ).  Your fingers will take a beating while you do this and may become quite tired. Do not give up. Rest one hand at a time if needed. Whatever you do, do not remove both hands until the boot is on ( unless you want it to fall off and then you get to start all over with it).

10) Now is the time to put the spring back on. Included in the BOOT KIT is a set of three spacers (an example of which is shown in illustration # 9). These spacers are to be used to hold the spring in place in the groove on the outside perimeter of the boot. As it will take both hands to stretch this spring into place, these spacers will prevent the spring from popping out when you let go of it to use both hands to stretch it further around the boot. Begin by pushing the spring down into the groove just forward from where the boot contacts the front shell at about the 12 o'clock position. While holding it in place with one hand, Use the other to tightly wedge the spacer above it, between the spring (in its groove) and the weight ring above it as shown in illustration # 10.

11) Working your way to the right, push the spring down into the groove. When you have placed the spring about 90 degrees around the opening from the first spacer, the spring will begin to get tight. Push in another spacer at that point ( making sure to keep checking the first spacer, if it pops out - the spring will pop out ).

12) Continue working your way around (while checking both spacers, you don't want them to slip out) until you reach 180 degrees from the first spacer. Install the third spacer.

13) The spring will be extremely tight now as shown in illustration # 11. Once you have gone more than half way around, the spring will be easier to roll into the rest of the groove ( so long as all three spacers are holding tight ). When you have the spring in place, make sure to remove the three spacers before proceeding to step # 14.

14) Replace the boot extrusion back onto the duct and pull it up over the ridge on the duct near the top of the opening. Reinstall the clamp in such a way that the clamp sits between the ridges on the extrusion and above the ridge on the duct. Snap the clamp closed with the copper tubing tool that you used previously.

15) Before attaching the new boot to the front panel, clean the surface of the front panel with alcohol or household cleaner. Also clean the flat surface of the new boot that will be contacting the front panel. This step is needed to remove the mold release material used in the manufacturing process and will allow the adhesive to stick.

16) Remount the boot onto the front panel as shown in figure # 13, making sure that the boot is not wrinkled. If large wrinkles exist, they may pool water in the boot and dribble onto the floor when the door is opened. If this is the case, pull it loose from the front panel and remount it slightly more clockwise or counter clockwise as needed.

17) Using the adhesive supplied in the kit, sparingly apply dots of glue under the edge of the boot as shown in picture # 14. Spot glue at the 12 o'clock, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 o'clock positions around the opening. Caution, you will need to wait a couple of hours before using the washer to allow the adhesive enough time to dry.



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 Posted: Sat Jul 9th, 2005 03:00 pm
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nickfixit
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Item 4) A piece of steel brake line will work too. it's harder to work with, but it makes a strong tool



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 Posted: Sat Jul 9th, 2005 07:13 pm
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Jimmy
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Thank you wise ones.  :notworthy:

It sounds easy enough. :D  A few questions:

Since my boot is in good condition and only the spring needs reinstallation, do I have to purchase a new boot kit?  (it's not in stock at this time)

If I don't purchase the replacement kit, what can I use (or make) for the three spacers?  What kind of glue should be used to reattach the boot to the outer opening?

I humbly forward these thought to you.

Jimmy

 

 

 

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 Posted: Sun Jul 10th, 2005 12:18 am
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nickfixit
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1)you don't need any new parts

2) fuel line hose about 1/2" in diameter cut into 1' long pieces

3)silicone seal will work, the factory uses crazy glue. Don't go wild with the glue. The next person (maybe you) may need to take that boot off.

 



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 Posted: Tue Jan 10th, 2006 05:01 am
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pmsmusicguy
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nickfixit,

I am the owner of a kenmore frontloader 417.401420000.  I recently purchased a complete tub assembly (including both front and rear outer tubs and the inner tub).  I now am planning on removing the front boot from the original front outer tub and installing it onto the new front outer tub.  From reading forums on this task, I see it is a 17-step operation!  Step #10 speaks of the 3 spacers included in the boot kit used to replace the spring.  Since I am not purchasing a new boot kit, but am reusing the old boot, I am planning on using your idea of using fuel line hose, 1/2" in diameter, but, and here's my question: you say cut into 1' pieces.  Do you mean 1" pieces?  How many spacers should I use?

Thanks for your reply!

rick

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 Posted: Mon Aug 14th, 2006 04:52 am
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petercharak
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Hey guys, a question. I've seen a couple of posts where it was stated to glue the boot at 15 degree intervals starting at the 12 o'clock position and ending at the 270 degree position (9 o'clock).  So, why are three quarters of the circumference glued but not the last quarter (makes no sense to me)? 

Thanks for the great forum.  I've just picked up (by the side of the road) a 1998 Frigidaire Galaxy front loader with drivebelt burned apart at the motor pulley and MAJOR wear of bearings, and of course seal failure (my wife always wanted a front loader).  The bearings were so bad that the drum was worn through at the upper two segments, causing liquid to splash out, remove friction, and cause motor pulley to  spin against stationary belt until belt was melted through.

So, what to do.  New belt, and bearing /seal kit. Or a new rear half or complete tub, depending on price (have seen some real low ones).  Dilemma is that I don't know the quality of bearings/seals on these kits.  Not particularly interested  in redoing the job five years hence.

I can buy good SKF's, and a quality seal.  I have presses, installation is no big deal. 

What I'm puzzled by is why these units fail in such a short time,  when Mieles presumably don't (have no stats from Europe, but have found no complaints).

Also, I don't understand the argument that oversoaping/suds cause seals to fail.  Though we are cheapskates and don't believe that susds mean "cleaning power" I can't see why the oversoaper should cause the seal to fail (suds cause no pressure in the system - as suggested by one poster).   

Thanks in advance for any insightis or suggestions.

Peter

 

 

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 Posted: Mon Aug 14th, 2006 07:13 am
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AccApp
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Yup, stuff often ends up roadside for a reason. If I were you I'd simply replace the rear tub shell, it comes with the bearings installed. Be sure and check out the condition of the three spin tub arms, they tend to crack and/or lose/shear the retaining bolts. I hear the whole front shell/rear shell/ spin tub assembly is available complete. The cheapest route would certainly be to epoxy up the holes in the rear shell and replace the bearings.



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 Posted: Tue Aug 15th, 2006 06:18 am
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petercharak
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Thanks for the reply and comments.  I took the easy way out - complete tub assembly for 150CAD from Sears - a "Tub kit".  They have about 300 backordered in Canada.  Don't know what it means - appease irate customers, or cheap junk for that price.  By the way - the parts people weren't able to tell me exactly what  "tub kit" meant.  Front and back, with bearing and seals for sure from their picture, but no info on insides -  not the way I'd run a parts department.   

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