- Home


Air Conditioners | Dehumidifiers | Dishwashers | Disposals | Dryers | Freezers | Humidifiers | Ice Makers | Microwave Ovens | Ovens, Ranges, Stoves | Refrigerators | Trash Compactors | Washers | Water Filters

FAQs | Contact | Apprenticeship | Parts | Model Number Help | Newsletter | Beer

Find Appliance Parts & Diagrams Here
Enter a model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.

365-day return policy on all parts ordered through this site!


 Moderated by: RegUS_PatOff, BrntToast, appl.tech.29501 Search Our Sites for More Info!
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
Kenmore 110.82441800  Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Sat Dec 29th, 2007 09:13 pm
  PM Quote Reply
1st Post
sgtb
Senior Apprentice Appliantologist


Joined: Wed Aug 31st, 2005
Location: Arlington, TX
Posts: 22
Flavorite Brew: 
Status: 
Offline
I believe that the washer that I have is a Kenmore 110.82441800.  The first three digits are some that were given to me during a previous post a few years ago. 
(http://applianceguru.com/forum2/2623.html)

The washer has been doing well until about 2months ago it began to stop half way through the wash cycle when it was on the sturdy/cotton setting.  By switching to delicate or permanent press it worked ok until about a week or so ago.  Now it stops about every two out of three loads at various points.  It doesn't seem to matter if the load is small or large or what the water temp is set on. 

Generally if I just go and nudge the switch it will start back up and run for a while. Sometimes finishing the load other times not. Occasionally now it is also stopping just before the spin cycle and starts making some humming noises, but again when the switch is just tapped it will start back up.  Sometimes if I push in the switch and then pull it back out to start the washer it will work for more than one load before it starts stopping again.

I see that the switch has what appears to be a part number of 378130 and a model number of M520

Other numbers that may be of use or of interest are: 7.5A, 250 VAC.; 15A, 125 VAC; and 1/2 HP. 125-250 VAC.  There is also a 416 stamped into it along with what appears to be a wiring guide.

I took the cover off to get to the switch hoping to find something that might be serviceable rather than a box that may have to be totally replaced.  Is there anything that I can do with this switch that might work before replacing it? It seems like it may just have something inside that's a little loose that is keeping the contacts from making a good conection.

The good news might be that by entering the p/n above, I found a switch on the Repair Clinic Parts page with the number 1058885
(at: http://www.repairclinic.com/referral.asp?R=154&N=1058885)

I just want to check and make sure before I spend the money for this switch that it is most likely the problem.  I've read too many posts on the forums here where people have spent a lot of time and money fixing things that were not broken only to ask here and find out that they just needed to replace something else (that did fix the problem).

I appreciate your time to help.

Last edited on Sat Dec 29th, 2007 11:57 pm by

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Sun Dec 30th, 2007 12:06 am
  PM Quote Reply
2nd Post
Samurai Appliance Repair Man
Fermented Grand Master of Appliantology


Joined: Mon Mar 21st, 2005
Location: Otterville, New Hampshire USA
Posts: 16082
Flavorite Brew: Kirin Ichiban
Status: 
Offline
sgtb wrote:

I just want to check and make sure before I spend the money for this switch that it is most likely the problem.  I've read too many posts on the forums here where people have spent a lot of time and money fixing things that were not broken only to ask here and find out that they just needed to replace something else (that did fix the problem).


You have learned well, my young Apprentice. Now unsheath that katana and let's kick some appliance boot-ay. :samurai:

To confirm, you will need your meter or voltage sensing light stick and the washer's wiring diagram (pasted to the inside back wall). Use the wiring diagram to identify the wire sending voltage to the cycle-appropriate speed winding on the motor. You could also do this test right down at the motor itself but you'll need to remove the cabinet for this-- piece of cake if you're interested in going this route.



____________________
To ask a question, use our new forums==> http://appliantology.org

365-Day No-Hassle Return Policy on all parts purchased through this site, even electrical parts that have been installed!
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Sun Dec 30th, 2007 01:01 am
  PM Quote Reply
3rd Post
sgtb
Senior Apprentice Appliantologist


Joined: Wed Aug 31st, 2005
Location: Arlington, TX
Posts: 22
Flavorite Brew: 
Status: 
Offline
and I'm checking for a bad wire? bad motor? or a bad switch?

Just to make sure, I check the voltage during each type of cycle to make sure that the correct amount of voltage (according to the wiring diagram) is getting through the switch to the motor, right?  Then if it is am I to assume that the motor is bad? or is this just to double check that the switch is bad?

Just to make sure that I was clear, when the washer stops before the end of the cycle, generally just have to tap the selecter knob and it will fire right back up and start going for a while.  Sometimes I try to turn it off and then back on to try and get the contacts to hold better.  I thought that it was just vibrating loose, but lately it's also been stopping during the soak period (not sure if at the begining, middle or end of it though since the dial isn't that acurate). 

I'll be checking voltages tomorrow.  After I can have time to pull it all the way out from the wall to get back there and see the diagram.

Thanks for getting back so quickly.

 

 

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Sun Dec 30th, 2007 01:14 am
  PM Quote Reply
4th Post
Samurai Appliance Repair Man
Fermented Grand Master of Appliantology


Joined: Mon Mar 21st, 2005
Location: Otterville, New Hampshire USA
Posts: 16082
Flavorite Brew: Kirin Ichiban
Status: 
Offline
sgtb wrote:
and I'm checking for a bad wire? bad motor? or a bad switch?


Your checking for voltage or the lack thereof, plain n' simple. Don't make this complicated.

See this article for help on making simple electrical measurements:

http://fixitnow.com/2004/12/appliance-repair-revelation-making.htm



____________________
To ask a question, use our new forums==> http://appliantology.org

365-Day No-Hassle Return Policy on all parts purchased through this site, even electrical parts that have been installed!
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Sun Dec 30th, 2007 01:27 am
  PM Quote Reply
5th Post
sgtb
Senior Apprentice Appliantologist


Joined: Wed Aug 31st, 2005
Location: Arlington, TX
Posts: 22
Flavorite Brew: 
Status: 
Offline
oh, that's what that yellow thing with the red and black wires is?

just kidding, It's a good refresher.  I'll measure tomorrow afternoon and report back.

I'm sure that you'll be holding your breath!

But, seriously, thanks.  I guess I'm just ready to get the thing working so I can (hopefully) impress my family and friends who would have already thrown this thing out and bought a new one (or maybe two) by now.

 

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Sun Dec 30th, 2007 07:46 am
  PM Quote Reply
6th Post
Budget Appliance Repair
Fellow, Academy of Sublime Masters of Appliantology
 

Joined: Sat Apr 2nd, 2005
Location: Eureka, California USA
Posts: 2870
Flavorite Brew: 
Status: 
Offline
I would say from your description, it is 99.9% certain that the timer control is bad.

Pull the plastic cover off and look at the contacts, you will most likely see one or more sets of contacts that are blackened and burnt.



____________________
William Burk (Willie)
Willie's Budget Appliance Repair
Eureka, CA 95501
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Sun Dec 30th, 2007 09:35 pm
  PM Quote Reply
7th Post
sgtb
Senior Apprentice Appliantologist


Joined: Wed Aug 31st, 2005
Location: Arlington, TX
Posts: 22
Flavorite Brew: 
Status: 
Offline
"Pull the plastic cover off and look at the contacts, you will most likely see one or more sets of contacts that are blackened and burnt."

I haven't gotten to work on it yet today, but the switch unit is a metal box that has a post for the knob, what I think is the timer unit, and a place for all the wires to connect.  There isn't any type of plastic except for the block that holds the wire harnes.  The box has metal tabs that are bent on the sides to hold it together.  I didn't want to undo these yet  to make sure that I didn't break it further.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Sun Dec 30th, 2007 11:27 pm
  PM Quote Reply
8th Post
appl.tech.29501
Fellow, Academy of Sublime Masters of Appliantology


Joined: Sun Oct 7th, 2007
Location: South Carolina USA
Posts: 6784
Flavorite Brew: waffle house coffee
Status: 
Offline
the metal box you are refering to is the timer, and if you can jiggle the knob and make it start and stop then it is definitely bad.

Go ahead with your voltage checks like the Samurai instructed, it will be a good learning exp. for ya ;)



____________________
If you would like to make a donation you may do so at the link below

http://homepage.mac.com/zenzoidman/appl.tech.29501/
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Mon Dec 31st, 2007 08:41 am
  PM Quote Reply
9th Post
Budget Appliance Repair
Fellow, Academy of Sublime Masters of Appliantology
 

Joined: Sat Apr 2nd, 2005
Location: Eureka, California USA
Posts: 2870
Flavorite Brew: 
Status: 
Offline
Once you take a real good look at the timer you will under stand what I mean....

It may not be a plastic cover on yours, it may be one of the older ones with a thin metal cover. Just a couple of little tabs that will hold that cover on, and you can't mess the timer up anymore by taking just that cover off, but it will expose the ends of the contacts, (opposite were the wires attach), so you can maybe see evidence of burnt contacts.

I can lots of times fix these to get a machine in operation until I can get the timer if the points aren't completely burnt away by doing a little tweeking and filing of the burnt contacts. I disassemble the complete timer to get good access by unbending those tabs that you were talking about, but I really wouldn't suggest that unless you fill pretty comfortable with your mechanical ablities.

It's not really that difficult, you just got to be carefull and watch how it all comes apart and sometimes getting the big plastic main cam back in place with the timer escapement levers that move it can be a pain sometimes.



____________________
William Burk (Willie)
Willie's Budget Appliance Repair
Eureka, CA 95501
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Sat Jan 5th, 2008 12:26 am
  PM Quote Reply
10th Post
jahjahbinks



Joined: Sat Jun 25th, 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 271
Flavorite Brew: GREEN TEA
Status: 
Offline
with your old timer this is also a good time to discover the true use of the emory board , (learning curve only) sometimes you can cut a flat emory board and file the (PITTED) contacts , this won`t work if they are burnt off . it`s a bandaid fix at best however this allows me to get a true reading on my amprobe to determine if i will be replacing the motor soon with out buying a part first.



____________________
outerspace holds the key to the biggest mystery in the universe . where do women come from ?
Currently serving SPEED QUEEN , HUEBSCH
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Tue Jan 8th, 2008 05:42 pm
  PM Quote Reply
11th Post
sgtb
Senior Apprentice Appliantologist


Joined: Wed Aug 31st, 2005
Location: Arlington, TX
Posts: 22
Flavorite Brew: 
Status: 
Offline
jahjahbinks wrote: with your old timer this is also a good time to discover the true use of the emory board , (learning curve only) sometimes you can cut a flat emory board and file the (PITTED) contacts , this won`t work if they are burnt off . it`s a bandaid fix at best however this allows me to get a true reading on my amprobe to determine if i will be replacing the motor soon with out buying a part first.


I took the switch apart today.  & Yes several of the contact points are pretty ugly.  None are completely burned through yet.  So I'll smooth them out and try that for the time being.

When I measured the voltages as well, I got a good 120VAC for the motor at each of the three settings while the agitator was going.  I'm guessing that that means through the rest of each cycle it is getting the right voltage unless the contacts on the switch are arcing

It did also look like the "plunger" part of the switch that is attached to the opposite side of the big switch cylinder from the actual knob might be cracked as well.  I suppose that's why it's not always making good contact and will work only when I pull the knob out sometimes.  Either that or something's wrong with the contact that plunger activates to allow or stop current.

Filing points now.  Will put the bandaid back together and start looking for $100 in the cracks of the couch and under the seat in the car to help pay for a new switch.  Is that one I mentioned above the right one?

Other thoughts welcome --  thanks

Last edited on Tue Jan 8th, 2008 05:42 pm by sgtb

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Tue Jan 8th, 2008 11:32 pm
  PM Quote Reply
12th Post
appl.tech.29501
Fellow, Academy of Sublime Masters of Appliantology


Joined: Sun Oct 7th, 2007
Location: South Carolina USA
Posts: 6784
Flavorite Brew: waffle house coffee
Status: 
Offline
yes, that is the correct part #



____________________
If you would like to make a donation you may do so at the link below

http://homepage.mac.com/zenzoidman/appl.tech.29501/
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Tue Jan 15th, 2008 08:46 am
  PM Quote Reply
13th Post
sgtb
Senior Apprentice Appliantologist


Joined: Wed Aug 31st, 2005
Location: Arlington, TX
Posts: 22
Flavorite Brew: 
Status: 
Offline
it seems that there was one contact that seems to have lost it's "springiness" as well and it wasn't able to make contact any longer due to the pitting.  I bent the tab up a little and ran the switch through several cycles with the multi-meter on continuity check for several of the worst contacts. and files and bent until it all worked "on the test bench" (in this case the kitchen table). 

Thanks a lot.  I'm not happy about knowing that I still need a new switch, but I am thrilled that I don't need a new washer.  now if manufacturers (of nearly everything these days) would only take a lesson and realize that a 20+ year old washer can still work and quit making things that break, we'd have a lot less trash in the dumps and more money to  buy higher quality stuff.  I wouldn't mind paying more for new stuff if I knew it would last longer than the junk-cheep stuff.  Like my nearly 200K & 270K mile cars and what not.  That's getting the money's worth out of it so that i can spend it on other things. (anyway probably preaching to the choir here).

 

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

Current time is 03:57 pm Tell a friend about this page... all your other friends are doing it!  
- > Do-It-Yourself Appliance Repair Help > The Laundry Appliance Repair Forum > Kenmore 110.82441800 Top



Find Appliance Parts & Diagrams Here
Enter a model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.

365-day return policy on all parts ordered through this site!

FAQs | Contact | Apprenticeship | Parts | Model Number Help | Newsletter | Beer

Your Sometimes-Lucid Host:
- Home
"If I can't help you fix your appliance and make you 100% satisfied, I will come to your home and slice open my belly, spilling my steaming entrails onto your floor."


UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.1623 seconds (35% database + 65% PHP). 29 queries executed.

Web Analytics