- Home


Air Conditioners | Dehumidifiers | Dishwashers | Disposals | Dryers | Freezers | Humidifiers | Ice Makers | Microwave Ovens | Ovens, Ranges, Stoves | Refrigerators | Trash Compactors | Washers | Water Filters

FAQs | Contact | Apprenticeship | Parts | Model Number Help | Newsletter | Beer
- > Do-It-Yourself Appliance Repair Help > The Laundry Appliance Repair Forum > what is the max. length for a dryer vent?

Find Appliance Parts & Diagrams Here
Enter a model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.

365-day return policy on all parts ordered through this site!


 Moderated by: RegUS_PatOff, BrntToast, appl.tech.29501 Search Our Sites for More Info!
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
what is the max. length for a dryer vent?  Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Fri Oct 6th, 2006 03:33 pm
  PM Quote Reply
1st Post
tabcom
Grasshopper
 

Joined: Fri Oct 6th, 2006
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana USA
Posts: 6
Flavorite Brew: Pabst Blue Ribbon
Status: 
Offline
My Amanda Gas Dryer (ALG43RAW) is in my basement. The dryer vent runs from the floor to the ceiling  at a forty-five degree angle and then along a wall out to an exterior window vent. Approx. 15 feet in length. Is this configuration too long?

tabcom

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Sat Oct 7th, 2006 01:14 am
  PM Quote Reply
2nd Post
donn
Master Appliantologist
 

Joined: Mon Aug 14th, 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 129
Flavorite Brew: any....if it's FREE
Status: 
Offline
 sounds like you're boarderline -- are you using flex or rigid? rigid smooth wall 28 feet with 4 elbows -- metal flex 20 feet w/4 elbows--the outside terminal should have  a 4" opening. (general rule of thumb each elbow=4 feet of run)--- info taken from speed queen/amana dryer installation guide

Last edited on Sat Oct 7th, 2006 11:05 pm by donn



____________________
over 33,000 appliances repaired since 1978
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Sat Oct 7th, 2006 01:47 pm
  PM Quote Reply
3rd Post
Samurai Appliance Repair Man
Fermented Grand Master of Appliantology


Joined: Mon Mar 21st, 2005
Location: Otterville, New Hampshire USA
Posts: 16082
Flavorite Brew: Kirin Ichiban
Status: 
Offline
Depends on the type of venting material and the type of exhaust hood...



____________________
To ask a question, use our new forums==> http://appliantology.org

365-Day No-Hassle Return Policy on all parts purchased through this site, even electrical parts that have been installed!
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Sat Oct 7th, 2006 05:19 pm
  PM Quote Reply
4th Post
tabcom
Grasshopper
 

Joined: Fri Oct 6th, 2006
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana USA
Posts: 6
Flavorite Brew: Pabst Blue Ribbon
Status: 
Offline
Thank you kindly.
This alleviates much anxiety for my wife.

:bananadance:

Which in turns, allows me to move on to a defective timer switch in my dryer that is on order.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Sun Oct 8th, 2006 08:31 pm
  PM Quote Reply
5th Post
asteysn2



Joined: Mon Mar 21st, 2005
Location: San Marcos, (San Diego North County), California USA
Posts: 159
Flavorite Brew: Newcastle Ale, Watney's
Status: 
Offline
Trying not to get too technical but a "good" vent length is one that will not cause the "static pressure" to rise above 1/2 to 3/4 inch W.C.
A rise in static pressure will mean an accompanying drop in velocity pressure, as the two are inversely related.
Anything that will cause a rise in SP should be avoided as it will slow down air movement through the dryer.
Avoid long runs (12 feet and on would be considered long)
Avoid multiple bends. (a 90 deg bend is the same as effectively adding 5-9 feet of line)

I saw a house dryer instalation last month where the actual length of the run was about 35 feet, and there were 4 90 deg bends in it as well. Thats about 63 feet of effective run!

Since there was no way the run could be shortened, I installed a dryer boost fan in the last 1/3 of the run with a current sensing switch to activate it.

BTW, if youre wondering what the dryer insides and the venting looked like, it was about as clogged with lint as one can be... A REAL FIRE HAZARD

One more thing to consider.... why is it that we commonly light a fire in a lint filled machine and theres no fire extinquisher anywhere in the vicinity???
Bob Sankie,
Coastal Appliance, Heating & A/C
Serving San Diegos North County
http://www.coastalappliances.com



____________________
Robert Sankie
Coastal Appliance, Heating & Air
Website: http://www.coastalappliances.com
email: coastalserve@gmail.com
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Sun Oct 8th, 2006 10:01 pm
  PM Quote Reply
6th Post
Mad Mac
Fellow, Academy of Sublime Masters of Appliantology


Joined: Wed Mar 30th, 2005
Location: Moorpark (via Motherwell, Scotland), California USA
Posts: 1433
Flavorite Brew: Newcastle Brown Ale
Status: 
Offline
Firstly.,..welcome back Bob!

To add to Bob's excellent summary of venting science, modern (since about 1988) dryers do not do a good job of pushing upwards. Many modern homes have the laundry room stuck well away from an outside wall, necessitating a long run which often contains an upward run of some kind. Root of the problem is that the house builders do not talk to people like us in the appliance repair trade. They do not, AFAIK, talk to the appliance manufacturers.

Finally, great point re the fire extinguisher. I can't honestly recall ever seeing one in a laundry room on my travels...anyone?



____________________
Mad Mac....Pray to God he's out there....somewhere.
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Sun Oct 8th, 2006 10:05 pm
  PM Quote Reply
7th Post
nickfixit
Fellow, Academy of Sublime Masters of Appliantology


Joined: Tue Apr 26th, 2005
Location: Luna Pier, USA
Posts: 1520
Flavorite Brew: Samuel Adams
Status: 
Offline
Good point Bob.

I wonder how many homes could be saved each year if we all had a few fire extinguishers in key areas of the home?

Nick



____________________
" Giving numerical data to Sears management is like giving a monkey a machine gun. No one knows for certain what will happen, but you can be sure of two things... It will be real messy, and only the monkey will be unharmed"
Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Mon Oct 9th, 2006 01:37 pm
  PM Quote Reply
8th Post
Samurai Appliance Repair Man
Fermented Grand Master of Appliantology


Joined: Mon Mar 21st, 2005
Location: Otterville, New Hampshire USA
Posts: 16082
Flavorite Brew: Kirin Ichiban
Status: 
Offline
Mad Mac wrote:
Finally, great point re the fire extinguisher. I can't honestly recall ever seeing one in a laundry room on my travels...anyone?
Only one time, and the guy was a volunteer fireman. We have ours right outside the laundry room, the reasoning being that we want to be able to enter the room with the fire extinguisher already in hand instead of trying to get to the fire extinguisher with a blaze in progress.



____________________
To ask a question, use our new forums==> http://appliantology.org

365-Day No-Hassle Return Policy on all parts purchased through this site, even electrical parts that have been installed!
Back To Top PM Quote Reply

Current time is 07:28 am Tell a friend about this page... all your other friends are doing it!  
- > Do-It-Yourself Appliance Repair Help > The Laundry Appliance Repair Forum > what is the max. length for a dryer vent? Top



Find Appliance Parts & Diagrams Here
Enter a model number, part number, type of appliance, brand, or even a part description.

365-day return policy on all parts ordered through this site!

FAQs | Contact | Apprenticeship | Parts | Model Number Help | Newsletter | Beer

Your Sometimes-Lucid Host:
- Home
"If I can't help you fix your appliance and make you 100% satisfied, I will come to your home and slice open my belly, spilling my steaming entrails onto your floor."


UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.1045 seconds (18% database + 82% PHP). 27 queries executed.

Web Analytics