View single post by ccadwellx
 Posted: Sat Dec 31st, 2005 12:06 am
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ccadwellx

 

Joined: Thu Dec 29th, 2005
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SUCCESS!   My father brought over some calipers which we used to determine that I had deformed the top of the shaft when I used a hammer and dowel to get the old shaft out of the old shell casing.  With a metal file, some emery paper, and a lot of patience, we were able to (slowly) get the shaft head back into spec so that the new shell/bearings slipped onto the old shaft sweetly.    Then everything else went back together smoothly.

This was a big job - it took me (with help from my dad) about 6 hours to disassemble the machine and reassemble with the new shell/casing, but it's so nice to see a spin cycle without hearing that deafening roar.

I personally think that this design is flawed, given that so many people have written on many internet sites about bearing problems.  My machine was only four years old when the bearings went out.  Unfortunately I have TWO of these machines, since I bought the same model for my vacation home.  That's why I decided to put the time into understanding how it works and being able to fix it.  Hopefully my other machine won't have bearing problems anytime soon.

Well, my husband is amazed that I attempted this, and even more surprised that I succeeded.   Thanks so much to all of you for writing about your past experiences with repairing this machine.  It was valuable information.   And some advice for others:

-  these resources were invaluable:  a laptop that I kept nearby with a blowup diagram of the inner tub that I referred to at least a hundred times, found at http://www3.sears.com/  (enter your washing machine model number and choose the view diagram option), and step-by-step instructions that I printed out and which guided me through the whole process http://www.zenzoidman.com/documents/RearBearingV6.pdf

-  put all your screws/fastener groups into individual baggies and label them.  That saved me lots of time when reassembling things.

-  label both sides of connection points that aren't intuitive - the small diameter hose that attaches to the water level gauge is a good case in point - I'm so glad I labeled both sides when I disconnected the tube from the red plastic thing hanging off the top of the washing machine - I think I'd still be looking for where that connected to.  Most connections, though, are pretty intuitive.

-  If the inner basket won't come out of the shell because the bearings are shot, DON'T pound too hard on the shaft (unless you have calipers, a metal file, emery cloth and a lot of time to do repair work).  Use Liquid Wrench, douse it, and let it sit for awhile.  After an hour, I was able to remove the old basket with much less force.  I used a 1-inch dowel (about 5" long) to punch out the shaft from the old casing.

Good luck and many happy repairs!

Last edited on Sat Dec 31st, 2005 12:15 am by