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Maytag Dishwasher Drain Cycle Failing  Rating:  Rating
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 Posted: Wed Oct 26th, 2005 06:53 pm
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When you stated you replaced the starter coil on the motor, I assume you mean the whole motor centrifugal switch included correct? If that is the case we then would want to explore further. Before we jump all over the brng as the problem, we would want to verify that the motor is getting the correct voltage from the timer to power up the start winding (120vac from Rd 30 to White at the motor). There are two different wires coming down to that motor from the timer to bring an opposite potential to the motor depending on which direction we are going to go in. In drain, that wire would be RD 30. You might want to inspect it from the timer down to the motor and make sure we are not burnt, frayed or corroded. In the final drain, you should be closed from Terminal 30 to terminal 1 on the timer. Usually when the lower brng goes on these units, the belt will have a tendency to slip and possibly burn as opposed to causing your motor to overheat and shut off. Let us know what you find. 



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 Posted: Wed Oct 26th, 2005 08:52 pm
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The lower housing. impellers and brng (Maytag part # 901459) as I remember correctly was about the same as far as resistance of the pulley when trying to turn it. Again, I have had them seize and not kick the motor/overload off as yours is doing. They usually just burn that round belt up to a crisp. I am concerned about your bearing being dramatically tighter in one direction, but I do not think it is the cause of your problems. If you can get the unit to act up, slip the belt off and try it. If it still does it, that rules out the bearing.



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 Posted: Thu Oct 27th, 2005 01:01 am
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ScottWrestlingMaytag
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I tested the motor with the belt disconnected... I couldn't manage to get it in a state where there was an overload. Every time the motor spun up the way it was supposed to.

I put a voltmeter on the drain coil and when we go in drain mode, 120 VAC. Doesn't seem to be anything wrong there. It's leading me to believe the the pump was my problem. Not sure why the belt didn't slip though, I would think the motor would have plenty of torque...

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 Posted: Thu Oct 27th, 2005 02:32 am
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Until you catch it I would not replace the bearing. That Assembly I list was about $150 last time I quoted the job. That motor you replaced was a 1/3 HP and over 3400rpms (Your wrist was probably a little tired trying to install it). That little belt and bearing would not of stood a chance (I could be wrong, just don't tell my wife or techs!!). Today's dishwasher motors look like little Dremel tools. Have you checked the connections at the timer on the RD30 wire? 



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 Posted: Thu Oct 27th, 2005 04:41 pm
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I haven't checked the connections at the timer yet. I disassembled a lot of the dishwasher already and was reluctant (and the g-friend wasn't too enthusiastic) to keep going. Wouldn't the measurement of the 120 V at the motor discount a bad connection at the timer?

I agree the motor is big on this thing, no Dremel tool here, but I wonder what the overcurrent switch on it is set to? Have they possibly designed it to trip a lower value than the motor's max (just shooting in the dark here)? I guess (and this seems more dangerous) I could try putting some resistance on the pulley and see what it takes to make it trip.

The quote I've got for the new bearing (900896) is $87.44 CDN, plus a pump repair kit (901109) for $55.64 CDN.

If I'm going to repair this dishwasher, I'm going to have to replace the bearing and impeller as they were damaged during disassembly (are these things typically glued together?). Right now the dilemma that I'm faced with is if I spend the money to rebuild the pump, am I going to find that I've got some other problem (bad timer, etc) that's going to cost even more?? If I can rebuild the pump and everything is good, probably it's worth it, but if I have to replace the timer too ($200+) then I'll probably just buy a new dishwasher (a shame... this old dishwasher has a nice simple design, few parts).

This is why I'm trying to debug all the possibilities before spending any more money. Thanks very much for your help!

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 Posted: Thu Oct 27th, 2005 08:33 pm
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I would not buy anything until the problem surfaces enough to verify it. The problem with 120vac at the motor was the unit was working. We need to catch it when it is not and do the check. It is not uncommon for a timer cam to be intermittent until it finally burns enough to never allow current through it. The part I listed was the assembly complete as opposed to re-building it myself. THe motor is controlled by a thermal overload. The fact that it hms and turns slowley indicates a loose of the start winding.........usally.  



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 Posted: Thu Oct 27th, 2005 08:52 pm
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ScottWrestlingMaytag
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If the start winding is gone on a motor (or not being supplied), wouldn't it typicaly just sit and hum, not turn slowly? Although I guess if there was some current (maybe not full) then you would get some starting torque.

Am I then seeing the thermal overload due to overcurrent on the main winding (we're not spinning up fast enough)? I could test this by disconnecting the drain start terminal (RD30) and see how the motor behaves when it hits the drain cycle. I shouldn't burn out the main winding doing this, right (the thermal overload switch should protect it)?

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 Posted: Thu Oct 27th, 2005 10:11 pm
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All is theory till we catch it with a meter. The unit is powering up both the start and the run at first. Approximately 1-2 seconds into starting the motor is turning enough RPM's for the centrifugal switch to open. At this point, the start winding drops out and the main winding is able to maintain it from there. If the start winding is not energized, or is not getting 120VAC due to pitted or burned contacts, the motor will turn slightly until the locked rotor condition of the motor kicks off the thermal protector built into the motor. If you pulled the wire off to test it you would not burn out the motor if you did it once or twice. It is not a good habit to get into. The best thing to do is catch it doing it and prove it 100%. Heck, if you can get it to fail, you can quickly switch the wash and drain wires on the switch and turn the timer to wash. At this point it would take off in drain in the wash setting because of your intentional miss wire. If it took off like a champ chances are it is not the bearing. No one likes fixing older units more then me, but I do not want you to throw good money away. I have never looked a customer in the eye and said, "I think it's the timer, or hey, lets throw a bearing at it". You always want to be sure. The older units get, the more they charge for parts. If we can get it to fail, we can determine the cause.



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 Posted: Fri Oct 28th, 2005 12:59 am
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I've tried a bunch of times with the belt disconnected (not that there's anything to connect it to). I couldn't get it in the overload condition.

So, I did another experiment... I put the belt around the motor pulley and out the front of the dishwasher and then turned it on while I provided resistance on the belt. The belt would not slip on the pulley and after about three seconds, snap! the overload tripped on the motor. I didn't really have to provide much resistance at all to stop the motor.

I'm thinking that the problem I have is with the pump. It's too bad that the belt didn't slip in the first place, it would have made saved me buying a new motor!!

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 Posted: Tue Nov 1st, 2005 02:59 pm
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I got my new bearing and impeller kit last night and I rebuilt the pump. It now spins smoothly in BOTH directions now and when I installed it, everything seems good. I ran it for a little while in both wash and drain and so far everything is working. I'm crossing my fingers, but I think this thing is fixed.

Thanks very much for your help!!

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 Posted: Thu Mar 29th, 2007 07:10 pm
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No, you cannot change the bearing in the latter dishwasher. 

By the way, just so everybody knows, on the old dishwashers, like the earlier one mentioned where he  replaced the bearing and the impeller, the complete pump assembly, part #901459 is no longer available, so we won't be seeing too many of these belt drive dishwashers  in the field.



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